High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

A HIIT session is carried out once a week usually after the last weight training workout, so if these workouts were performed on say Monday, Wednesday and Friday for example, the HIIT session would be done on the Saturday or Sunday before commencing the next three resistance workouts.

It consists of short intense bursts of high-intensity exercise followed by varied periods of low-intensity active recovery, or complete rest. HIIT can improve insulin sensitivity, increase fat oxidation and BMR (basal metabolic rate), meaning an individual can burn more calories at rest, through a process called EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption) and through experience I believe it to be the perfect accompaniment to any weight training schedule. The HIIT sessions I implemented at Wolds Way to Health gym were carried out on a stationary cycle/bike, a watt-bike to be precise but can be performed on any cardio machine or countless other pieces of gym equipment and even using bodyweight exercises at home.

The intervals I initially imposed were 30 second intense bursts followed by a period of 90 seconds active recovery, where the legs are still turning on the pedals but are applying no real pressure and the aim is to take in oxygen whilst bringing the heart rate back down in preparation for the next intense burst. As fitness levels increase, progression in the form of more intervals and shorter recovery periods is made over the 12 week period.

Like the Resistance Training the HIIT is designed for somebody new to exercise and a fitter more experienced individual may wish to start further into the program or progress quicker than suggested to possibly gain more benefit.

Weeks 1 and 2

5 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 90 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 3 and 4

6 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 90 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 5 and 6

6 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 7 and 8

7 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Week 9

8 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 10, 11 and 12

10 BURSTS of 20 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 40 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

The type of exercise performed in a home-based HIIT session will depend on the physical capability and fitness of an individual. Ideally some form of cardio equipment such as a stationary cycle/bike would be used but any bodyweight exercise could be incorporated which would leave the participant out of breath after a short intense burst.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

A HIIT session is carried out once a week usually after the last weight training workout, so if these workouts were performed on say Monday, Wednesday and Friday for example, the HIIT session would be done on the Saturday or Sunday before commencing the next three resistance workouts.

It consists of short intense bursts of high-intensity exercise followed by varied periods of low-intensity active recovery, or complete rest. HIIT can improve insulin sensitivity, increase fat oxidation and BMR (basal metabolic rate), meaning an individual can burn more calories at rest, through a process called EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption) and through experience I believe it to be the perfect accompaniment to any weight training schedule. The HIIT sessions I implemented at Wolds Way to Health gym were carried out on a stationary cycle/bike, a watt-bike to be precise but can be performed on any cardio machine or countless other pieces of gym equipment and even using bodyweight exercises at home.

The intervals I initially imposed were 30 second intense bursts followed by a period of 90 seconds active recovery, where the legs are still turning on the pedals but are applying no real pressure and the aim is to take in oxygen whilst bringing the heart rate back down in preparation for the next intense burst. As fitness levels increase, progression in the form of more intervals and shorter recovery periods is made over the 12 week period.

Like the Resistance Training the HIIT is designed for somebody new to exercise and a fitter more experienced individual may wish to start further into the program or progress quicker than suggested to possibly gain more benefit.

Weeks 1 and 2

5 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 90 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 3 and 4

6 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 90 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 5 and 6

6 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 7 and 8

7 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Week 9

8 BURSTS of 30 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 60 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

Weeks 10, 11 and 12

10 BURSTS of 20 Seconds INTENSE ACTIVITY followed by 40 Seconds of ACTIVE RECOVERY

The type of exercise performed in a home-based HIIT session will depend on the physical capability and fitness of an individual. Ideally some form of cardio equipment such as a stationary cycle/bike would be used but any bodyweight exercise could be incorporated which would leave the participant out of breath after a short intense burst.